Friday, October 23, 2009

6 Reasons Your Resume Got No Response

4. They might be into you if you apply for a more appropriate job.

Independent recruiter Cheryl Ferguson tells Yahoo! HotJobs that many job seekers are overqualified, under-qualified, or otherwise just wrong. "If we need to fill a specific job, and you're not right for it, don't assume that we're going to find the right fit for you. A lot of times people send me resumes, and I want to ask, 'Did you even read the job description?'"

5. Your presentation could use some work.

"A lot of mistakes I see are a lack of cover letter, and an objective statement on the resume that is all wrong for the job opening," says Lindsay Olson, partner and recruiter at Paradigm Staffing. "Even worse are obviously mass emails where the candidates had no clue what they were applying for."

6. There isn't any job.

Sometimes, due to last minute budget cuts, a position is eliminated before it's even filled. Other times, according to Olson, companies reel in resumes even when they know there isn't any opening. "Some companies want a big applicant pool because they think they may be hiring in the future," Olson said.

How can you learn what happened?

If you feel like your resume is out at sea, and you'd at least like confirmation that you're out of the running, there are things you can do.

1. Contact the company.

Yes, the ad had a NO CALLS warning, and there wasn't a name anyway. But if you're pretty sure you're right for the job, and you've heard nothing after a week, you can still call someone to find out if you're at least in the running. Try to find the hiring manager (HR is too busy, and they almost never want to hear from you).

"If you do follow up by phone, don't leave a voice mail," Opton says. "Early in the morning or after five you're more likely to reach a real person."

Previous page | 1 | 2 | 3 | Next Page

 

New Grad Life Copyright © 2012 Community is Designed by Bie